Archive | Discussions

TCC Happy Hour – Day 1

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All Audiences
Session Description
Join the TCC Conference coordinators and staff to share your views about this event, talk story, and suggest how your conference experience may be improved.

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TCC Happy Hour – Day 3

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All Audiences
Session Description
Join the TCC Conference coordinators and staff to share your views about this event, talk story, and suggest how your conference experience may be improved.

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Ko’olaupoko: Reconnecting to place and history

Audience
All Audiences
Session Description
The goal of this course will focus on the first 5 weeks to introduce students with historical and cultural knowledge about place names and moʻolelo within each ahupuaʻa of the Koʻolaupoko, Oʻahu. This online instructional modules will enable students to identify and describe each ahupuaʻa, understand Hawaiian land divisions and terms, name at least 5 significant areas and summarize history be recalling moʻolelo.
Presenter(s)
  • Kamakanaokealoha Aquino, University of Hawai’i at Manoa, Waimanalo, Hawai’i, USA

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Connectivism as a Learning Theory for the Digital Age Copy

Audience
All Audiences
Presenter(s)
Ginger Harper
Bio coming soon!
Betsy Duke
Bio coming soon!
Mark Johnston
Mark_Johnston_64Mark Johnston has worked in education for over 15 years. He earned his Bachelor of Science in Chemistry and was ABD in Chemistry before changing his career path to mathematics education. After earning a Master of Science in Mathematics Education and Master of Science in Educational Leadership, he taught at the secondary and post secondary levels. Mark join Kaplan in 2004. He has been a course lead and subject matter expert for various courses through his tenure at Kaplan University.

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Relationship between English Teachers’ Beliefs and the Use of ICT in Classes – A Case Study in a Public High School in Japan

Audience
All Audiences
Session Description
In Japan, students begin learning English as a Foreign Language from the seventh grade or even lower grades. Conventional English teaching methods in Japan are said to be English-Japanese translation and grammar based instructions, and have a tendency to neglect developing communication skills. In EFL situations, however, it is important for learners to actually use English in a practical way. Information and Communication Technology (ICT) is gaining attention in educational fields. The Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology set articles which promote using ICT in classrooms in 2011. Effective use of ICT can make it possible to encourage students to practice communication, but given the present circumstances, ICT is used in classrooms by only a limited number of teachers in Japan. Earlier studies revealed that teachers’ teaching methods and strategies are strongly affected by their beliefs. The hypothesis of this study examines whether and how English teachers use of ICT in their classes depends on their beliefs of how English is learned as a foreign language. This study aims to compare two teachers’ classes and their beliefs, and clarify how their beliefs have effect on their use of ICT.
Presenter(s)
  • Ayuka Nakagawa, Kansai University, Takatsuki, Osaka, Japan

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Role of supporters for an International Exchange Study between Japanese and Cambodian Schools

Audience
All Audiences
Session Description
Education in Japan has changed due to globalization and the rapid development of information and communications technologies (ICT). As a result, international exchange studies give more attention to teaching about intercultural understanding. In this situation, students in Japan and in foreign countries may have opportunities to use ICT to communicate with each other. However, to carry out these practices, technical set up and preparation is needed. It is necessary to support teachers who are in charge of these activities.

In this case study, we attempted to clarify the role of technical support personnel for teachers involved in the International Exchange Study between Japan and Cambodia.

Presenter(s)
  • Sohei Daifuku, Kansai University, Takatsuki, Osaka, Japan

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Tech Tool Slam

Audience
All Audiences
Session Description
A fun, educational, and informal tech tool sharing session where participants present mobile and desktop tools and discuss how it helps educators or professionals. Each participant has 6-7 minutes to share his or her recommended tool. (NOTE: This is a 45-min interactive session.)
Presenter(s)
  • Frank Jumawa, University of Hawaii, Honolulu, Hawaii, USA
  • Kimble McCann, University of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI, USA
  • Rebecca Meeder, University of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI, USA

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Integrating Web 2.0 and Mobile Technologies to Promote Accessbility and Universal Design for Learning in a STEM Course: Lessons Learned

Audience
Novice
Session Description
This presentation will outline the lessons learned and formative evaluation findings from a technology integration effort in a STEM class in a large Pacific university. The STEM class is co-taught by five instructors with expertise in mathematics, science, art, special education, and educational technology. The activity that will be discussed in this presentation is an eight-week moon investigation lesson that has been designed to provide students with the opportunity to engage in realistic and meaningful scientific inquiry. The activity is being piloted and evaluated in Spring 2014. Research-based strategies of effective practice for culturally and linguistically diverse students are being integrated into the course, and technology integration is being modeled explicitly and implicitly through online and in-class examples.

For the moon investigation activity, students are building their own websites, contributing to blogs, and using iPad Minis to collect and digitize data over the course of the activity. The multimedia artifacts they create over the course of the assignment will be used to create a final multimedia report as a representation of their learning. Using a constructivist framework, the activity requires that students perform observations of the moon, think critically about the observations they are making, reflect on what they are learning, and share their learning with others. Building on this, students receive direct instruction on how they can use similar processes and procedures to explore complex scientific concepts with elementary school students.

Presenter(s)
  • Matthew Schmidt, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu, USA
  • Lori Fulton, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu, USA

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Examining the Usability of an Elementary School Website

Audience
All Audiences
Session Description
Throughout a school year, important information must be communicated between schools and families of elementary students. Despite communication via newsletters, emails, and flyers, some information is lost in the transition from the classroom to home. A school website allows parents and family members to access important, current information about their child’s school. But to be effective, it must be easy to navigate and use. The purpose of this usability study was to evaluate the content and organization of a school website to enable developers to improve its effectiveness for parents and families. The study was conducted with six parents. Data were collected using screencasting software to record the computer screen activity and participants were asked to talk aloud during navigation of the website while being audio recorded. In addition, field notes were taken and participants completed a final survey. Analysis included qualitative coding of field notes, screencasts and audio transcripts and descriptive statistical analysis of survey data. Five out of the six participants were able to complete all four tasks in the study. Feedback from participants indicated that they found the website organized and up to date, but lacking some features such as testing scores, pictures of students, and a grading portal to name a few.
Presenter(s)
  • Christine Kotomori, University of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI, USA

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Using Mobile Device to Teach Tennis Instructors How to Teach the Rules of Tennis

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Session Description
Tennis instructors lack a formal background in teaching that would help them teach the rules of tennis to their students in ways that enhance retention and improve performance. The purpose of this project was to create and evaluate an iBook module to help tennis instructors teach the rules of tennis. The module was designed using iBook iAuthor and Mayer’s (Mayer, 2003a) eight principles of multimedia design to enhance cognitive processing during learning. All participants were well trained in playing the game with little to no background in teaching. Eight participants completed the module and several data collection instruments including a demographic survey, post and pre-test questionnaires and an attitudinal survey. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, looking for patterns in open-ended responses and through review of field notes taken by the researcher while observing on-court use. All participants agreed the module was an effective on-court tool that was useful, engaging, easy to use, well designed, and included quality content. They felt confident in using the tool and were highly satisfied. Seven of eight indicated they would definitely use it in the future.
Presenter(s)
  • Ty Aki, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu, USA

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