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Realizing Rental Energy Efficiency

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Session Description
Hawaii is one of the few states in the United States that utilizes crude oil to produce electricity. This practice has been shown to produce harmful emissions that damage the environment and contribute significantly to climate change. The first step towards reducing our demand for imported oil is to be conscious of and to reduce our oil consumption by increasing energy efficiency. Previous research has shown that low-income, multi-family, rental households utilized significantly more electricity per square foot than other types of households. Furthermore, energy efficient upgrades are most likely to be done when individuals recognize the financial benefits and environmental impacts of these upgrades. This project developed an asynchronous web-based instructional module to best inform the rental household target population about their options for greater energy efficiency and their benefits. The pre- and post-survey results revealed greater potential for behavioral change when financial incentives are realized and energy users are directly accountable for their electric bill.
Presenter(s)
  • Sean Walsh, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Wailuku, USA

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From Paper to Pixels: A Usability Study of a Tsunami Safety E-Booklet

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Session Description
More people have died in Hawai‘i from tsunamis than from hurricanes, floods, and volcanoes combined, making it our State’s most deadly natural hazard. For tsunami education to be effective, especially in younger audiences, learners must be engaged through multiple modalities. To help meet this need, a paper-based tsunami safety booklet has been modernized to an e-booklet format. Using a turtle superhero as a guide, the Hawaii tsunami safety e-booklet helps educate 3rd through 5th grade students about tsunami hazards, preparedness, evacuation, warning, and risk. A research study was designed to evaluate the content, effectiveness, and user satisfaction of the interactive e-booklet through iterative usability testing. The two rounds of testing were conducted synchronously through Google Hangout where participants “thought outloud” as they explored the e-booklet content. Additional feedback was captured asynchronously through a survey link on each page of the e-booklet. A post-study captured additional attitudinal data. Changes were made to portions of the e-booklet focusing on the participants’ recommendations to include immediate audio and visual feedback, increased control over multimedia, personalization, and gamification. Feedback from the second round of usability testing indicate that improvements made to the e-booklet augmented the overall user experience.
Presenter(s)
  • Leon Geschwind, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Honoolulu, HI, USA

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User Centered Design of an e-learning Environment: Evaluating the User Experience

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Session Description
The rising cost of delivering training to employees has driven many corporate managers to migrate traditional methods of face-to-face instruction into e-learning environments. However, the conversion from synchronous to asynchronous delivery often poses the challenge of appropriating sufficient time and resource to the ADDIE phases of instructional design. Limited time and budgetary constraints often force instructional designers to employ alternative design processes that allow them to deploy instruction rapidly, evaluate data in real-time and employ dynamic design changes intuitively. This paper explores the iterative development process of an e-learning training environment that utilized User Experience evaluations to implement design revisions. All design revisions were based on the data analysis of a series of User Experience evaluations aimed at measuring both usability and learnability or “learner experience” of the e-learning environment. Synchronous, remote usability testing was conducted following Steve Krug’s framework for web usability and asynchronous learner experience embedded evaluations followed Kirkpatrick’s Four Level Training Evaluation Model. A total of three iterative cycles occurred within a three-month period. The results of eight usability tests and 138 learner experience evaluations are discussed.
Presenter(s)
  • Jessica Leauanae, University of Hawaii, Provo, UT, USA

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Designing a Mobile Learning Website for Military Medical Personnel

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Session Description
Medical augmentees at Joint POW/MIA Accounting Command are responsible for the health and welfare of team members deployed to remote regions of the world to extract remains of lost service members. No method was in place to prepare these individuals for mission prior to arriving on Oahu and information needed to be available as an online resource and viewable on mobile hand-held devices so members could access information prior to and during deployment. The purpose of the instructional design project was to develop and evaluate a web-based instructional website designed to provide necessary medical and mission knowledge to medical augmentees. Fifteen current and former augmentees were asked to review the Aloha Augmentee website, evaluate the quality of content and make recommendations for improvement. Data were collected via online pre and post surveys. The results of the collected data revealed that the website was viewed as successful with very positive qualitative feedback. Participants felt that the website could be even more effective with the addition of medical-grade photographs and more in-depth background about specific regional diagnoses. Feedback from participants will be used to improve the overall design and content of the website to better prepare future augmentees.
Presenter(s)
  • Stacy Brook, University of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI, USA

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Using Websites to Learn Security Operation Procedures

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Session Description
Security officers used a website module to learn and get a better understanding of a series of important task that must be done while on duty. Participants took a Pre-test to gauge their understanding of standard operation procedures before going through the module. After completing the module they took a Post-test and answered questions pertaining to the design and helpfulness of the module.
Presenter(s)
  • Kellen Rey, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu, Hawaii, USA

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Fostering English Common Core State Standards through Web 2.0 Tools for Secondary Teachers

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Session Description
Teachers in Hawai’i are pressured more than ever to incorporate technology into learning environments not only from societal expectations but also by the integration of Common Core State Standards as the leading guide for standards-based curriculum design. Thus, it is critical for teachers to receive training and resources that are necessary for the successful implementation of technology into teaching practices. This online instructional module was developed through a website using Weebly that shared information about four Web 2.0 tools to benefit both teachers and students. Therefore, the purpose of this instructional design project was to evaluate the effectiveness of the website and to compare attitudes of teachers towards using these online tools before and after they viewed the module. Of the twelve original teacher participants, eight were able to complete the module within the time allotted. The pre-survey data illustrated that all but one participant was at least somewhat familiar with Web 2.0 tools in general, yet most only used such tools for personal and social reasons. Post survey results, measured by varying Likert-scales and open-ended responses, indicated that participants were more comfortable and interested in using the four Web 2.0 tools in their teaching after completing the learning module.
Presenter(s)
  • Carly Mounts, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu, Hawaii, USA

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An Instructional Approach to Writing SMART Goals

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Session Description
Obtaining a degree is not the ultimate end goal; it is only one of many goals needed to ensure financial and professional success. Establishing a plan to success by writing specific, measurable, attainable, relevant and time-bound goals (SMART) should be utilized by both full-time graduate students and working professionals in graduate school. The purpose of this instructional design project was to create and evaluate a web-based module that provides participants with step-by-step instructions, examples and resources to writing short- and long-term goals, using the SMART method. Pre- and post-assessments were embedded into the module for participants to practice their writing skills and a rubric was also embed to promote self-efficacy. Survey results from pre- and post-assessments indicate that the instructional module was simply designed, and content was easily understood. However, the instructional module did not provide the instructional scaffolding needed for participants to write SMART goals proficiently, as reported by pre- and post-assessment rubric scores. Suggestions for improvement included using an interactive platform, audio component and a navigation bar throughout the module.
Presenter(s)
  • Eleanor Robins, University of Hawaii, Honolulu, Hawaii, USA

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Developing a Self-Paced, Web-based Instructional Module for Dissertation Preparation

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Session Description
As the number of part-time doctorate students increases, institutions offering evening or online Ph.D. programs need to re-evaluate the effectiveness of their dissertation preparation courses to help these part-time learners succeed. The University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa offers a college-wide Ph.D. in Education with a specialization in Educational Technology (ETEC). The ETEC Ph.D. program is campus-based, but courses are offered in the evenings with many courses offered in hybrid or online formats. ETEC 750e “Educational Technology Issues: Research” is a seminar that ETEC doctoral students must complete before advancing to candidacy and it plays an important role in dissertation preparation. However, due to the number of topics covered in the seminar, instructors have expressed concerns over students’ low concept attainment of one the seminar topics, prospectus writing. To improve students’ prospectus writing skills, the author developed a web-based instructional module on prospectus writing to supplement class lectures, and implemented formative evaluation to ensure the quality of the instructional module. Five of the eight students enrolled in ETEC 750e in spring 2014 completed the online module, and the data showed a positive shift in their knowledge and attitudes towards the prospectus writing. Implications of the project are discussed.
Presenter(s)
  • Ritsuko Iyoda, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu, USA

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Nā Iʻa Kapu: A Pre-Visit Online Lesson for Hanauma Bay

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Session Description
Natural areas like Hanauma Bay provide a captivating setting for place-based and culture-based science lessons. When students visit Hanauma Bay, they have limited time to learn about the bay during their visit. To enhance the field experiences of students, an online pre-fieldtrip lesson was developed for teachers to use to prepare their 3rd-5th grade students for a Hanauma Bay field visit. The lesson was designed to teach concepts of Hawaiian kapu (prohibitions or laws) as they relate to conservation and to Hawaiian reef fish biology. The lesson was developed using learning standards for the relevant grade levels and the ADDIE method of instructional design. 3rd-5th grade teachers and informal educators who have used Hanauma Bay as an educational site evaluated the instructional design via an anonymous online survey. Responses were received from 12 participants. Descriptive statistics were used to examine the responses and themes were derived from open-ended comments. Results indicated teachers perceived the lesson was engaging, aligned with class learning objectives, grade level appropriate, and would help to prepare students for a visit to Hanauma Bay. The teachers particularly valued the integration of science and Hawaiian culture and the connections made between kapu and fish life cycles.
Presenter(s)
  • Anne Rosa, University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa, Honolulu, Hawaiʻi, USA

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Evaluating the Usability of a Teacher-Created Website

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Session Description
Increased Internet access to more and more families provides schools with yet another avenue for encouraging parents to be more involved in their children’s education. K-12 schools frequently use classroom websites to improve parent-teacher communication. Although there have been recent studies on teacher perspectives for teacher-created websites, designing websites to enhance learning, and “best” website design elements, few recent usability studies on teacher-created websites were found. This usability study attempted to determine the design and navigation effectiveness of a teacher-created Senior Project website. The study design was based on suggestions provided by Steve Krug’s Rocket Surgery Made Easy (2010). Parents of high schools students were the target audience for this study. The results of this usability study determined the Senior Project website’s design and navigation to be effective for its intended purpose with most participants’ comments and responses being positive and very complimentary. The results indicated that while effective website design does support the effectiveness of users’ information search behaviors, successful web searches are highly dependent on users’ ability to recognize common website conventions, to recognize subject hierarchies, to distinguish between reading and scanning, and their ability to avoid, what Krug (2014) calls “satisfice” behavior.
Presenter(s)
  • Ryan Yoshizawa, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu, Hawaii, USA

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